For Love of Team™ | Winston Faircloth

060: Building Your People, Victoria Mininger

December 07, 2020 Winston Faircloth Season 2 Episode 60
For Love of Team™ | Winston Faircloth
060: Building Your People, Victoria Mininger
Chapters
For Love of Team™ | Winston Faircloth
060: Building Your People, Victoria Mininger
Dec 07, 2020 Season 2 Episode 60
Winston Faircloth

A construction company that's focused on building their people?  Well, here's your inspiration For the Love of Team.

Welcome to season two of the podcast. And this is Episode 60 of the newly renamed For Love of Team podcast.

This is part two of my conversation with Victoria Mininger. We recorded this a few months ago, and I saved it to be closer to the launch of her new book Daring to Fight.   Make sure you catch the last podcast episode for more on the book and her story. And check out her links below, especially the book trailer

And as we recorded that show, we also talked about her business journey as the CEO of Bear Creek Outdoor Living (www.bearcreek.co) in the mountains of Virginia.  Bear Creek has grown from just a mere idea into a recognized community leader by their Chamber of Commerce in just a few years. 

Listen in to hear:

  • The ONE thing that actually drives passion in business
  • The exact steps Victoria used to start building her team
  • Why hiring for aptitude is critical for team success
  • How to succeed being a servant leader in a boss-driven world
  • A unique way Bear Creek developed training to support all the employees 
  • The building blocks of workplace culture

And so much more.

This story is tangible proof that loving your team multiplies your results.

I've experienced this multiplication in my own leadership career.  Loving your products or clients more than your people limits your potential. 

Hearing Victoria's words in this podcast was ultimately the inspiration for the change for the podcast.  With a renewed focus on the power of teamwork, both in my business and with my conversations with you here on the podcast. 

Links from the Show

Bear Creek Outdoor Living (company website)
Daring to Fight: When Grit, Grace and Determination Take Depression Head On (Amazon)
Daring to Fight book trailer (YouTube)
VictoriaMininger. com (speaker website)

For Love of Team Foundational Retreats

Are you hitting the wall of complexity in your business? Does the idea of a team feel like a four letter word to you? And are you spending more time grinding in the business than doing the work you love?

When you're ready to ...
Multiply your Impact, your Income, your Margin and your Freedom in business...
Join hand-selected business owners just like you in an upcoming...
For Love of Team weekend retreat.

Our intimate, immersive and interactive experience helps you:
1) Sharpen your focus by doing more of the work you love
2) Simplify your business by eliminating/automating/delegating other tasks.
3) Surround yourself with others doing the work that they love

This is an invitation-only event.  To connect with Winston to see if this is a fit, book a 33 minute exploratory session using this link. 

Show Notes Transcript

A construction company that's focused on building their people?  Well, here's your inspiration For the Love of Team.

Welcome to season two of the podcast. And this is Episode 60 of the newly renamed For Love of Team podcast.

This is part two of my conversation with Victoria Mininger. We recorded this a few months ago, and I saved it to be closer to the launch of her new book Daring to Fight.   Make sure you catch the last podcast episode for more on the book and her story. And check out her links below, especially the book trailer

And as we recorded that show, we also talked about her business journey as the CEO of Bear Creek Outdoor Living (www.bearcreek.co) in the mountains of Virginia.  Bear Creek has grown from just a mere idea into a recognized community leader by their Chamber of Commerce in just a few years. 

Listen in to hear:

  • The ONE thing that actually drives passion in business
  • The exact steps Victoria used to start building her team
  • Why hiring for aptitude is critical for team success
  • How to succeed being a servant leader in a boss-driven world
  • A unique way Bear Creek developed training to support all the employees 
  • The building blocks of workplace culture

And so much more.

This story is tangible proof that loving your team multiplies your results.

I've experienced this multiplication in my own leadership career.  Loving your products or clients more than your people limits your potential. 

Hearing Victoria's words in this podcast was ultimately the inspiration for the change for the podcast.  With a renewed focus on the power of teamwork, both in my business and with my conversations with you here on the podcast. 

Links from the Show

Bear Creek Outdoor Living (company website)
Daring to Fight: When Grit, Grace and Determination Take Depression Head On (Amazon)
Daring to Fight book trailer (YouTube)
VictoriaMininger. com (speaker website)

For Love of Team Foundational Retreats

Are you hitting the wall of complexity in your business? Does the idea of a team feel like a four letter word to you? And are you spending more time grinding in the business than doing the work you love?

When you're ready to ...
Multiply your Impact, your Income, your Margin and your Freedom in business...
Join hand-selected business owners just like you in an upcoming...
For Love of Team weekend retreat.

Our intimate, immersive and interactive experience helps you:
1) Sharpen your focus by doing more of the work you love
2) Simplify your business by eliminating/automating/delegating other tasks.
3) Surround yourself with others doing the work that they love

This is an invitation-only event.  To connect with Winston to see if this is a fit, book a 33 minute exploratory session using this link. 

Victoria Mininger:

A construction company that's focused on building their people?. Well, here's your inspiration For the Love of Team. Welcome to season two of the podcast. I'm your host Winston Faircloth. And this is Episode 60 of the newly renamed For Love of Team podcast. This is part two of my conversation with Victoria Mininger. We recorded this a few months ago, and I saved it to be closer to the launch of her new book daring to fight. Make sure you catch the last podcast episode for more on the book and her story. And as we recorded that show, we also talked about her business journey as the CEO of Bear Creek outdoor living, which has grown from just a mere idea into a recognized community leader by their Chamber of Commerce in just a few years. This story was the tangible proof that loving your team multiplies your results I've experienced and in my own leadership career. But here, hearing Victoria's words in this podcast was ultimately the inspiration for a renewed focus on the power of teamwork, both in my business, and here on the podcast. And now here's part two of my conversation with Victoria. Alright, Victoria, I want to welcome you For Love of Team podcast. Thank you for being our very first guest for that, as well. Thank you for having me, it certainly is a pleasure. Well, why don't you tell us a little bit about your journey and and who you are the people that you're serving and how you've really focused on your team, and how you got to that place. Yeah, so I am first wife, to my husband, Brian been married about 24 years. And we have four daughters. And we've always been entrepreneurial, I guess, definitely have worked for other people probably learned most of my skill working for others, and bookkeeping and management and that sort of thing. And did that career for 20 plus years, until I just was ready to pivot and do something different. And so back in 2016, the early part of 2016, I was just ready to kind of move into something new, was just and honestly, I was okay to just do whatever, as long as involved bookkeeping. I just wanted something different, right. And so at the time, my husband was working for a contractor himself, and they were in need of construction cleaning help. It was it just was a real shortage in the industry. And so I'm like, Well, I know how to clean I know how to do that, you know, and stuff. And so began this business, this small, little business, me, myself and I called Bear Creek. And at the time, we focus strictly on just construction cleaning. And doing that. And over the course I guess in the last four years I went from myself to this is really fast forward to about 39 on staff. And we actually have done a lot of shifts and changes in the last four years. From a construction cleaning company to now we're really niche down in the residential market, as a contractor helping people build out their backyards, with decks and patios and that sort of thing. And, and while we love what we build, what we have on the side of our trucks is that, you know, we build cool stuff, but more importantly, we truly strive to build people. Because for me, at the end of the day, it has to be more than just about the product, there's got to be something deeper that drives that passion. And for us. And for me, it's really seeing people just thrive and grow and who, you know, God has created them to be. I love this story so much. And I'm honored that you're our first guest on this version of the podcast, because I've watched your progress over the last couple of years as you've progressed, but how did you get the idea to start out with cleaning these construction sites? That'd be a seems like a very interesting way to start a construction business. Right? Yeah, like I would love to tell you that I had a five year plan or even a one year plan didn't have any of that sometimes we just we go with what's in our gut and looking we looked, I looked for the opportunity that was around me. And like I said, My husband was already working with a contractor and and so I looked at the opportunity and said okay, well I can start at least cleaning and then in my head was thinking I could build that out the margins were really good, right on the money. And it did not take a lot of startup I started with $350 to get my license to get my insurances in place and to buy a few products and literally rated my cleaning closet because I was like, all this is going to take is elbow grease and as we as we grew we you know we purchased more equipment to take care of bigger spaces and that's sort of thing. And then I also began hiring people just part time out on an as needed basis. And so really started working with, with people just one on one that way. So I didn't have employees for the longest, at least not full time employees until my husband came on board. I hired him about six months later, to come on board with us. And so yeah, let's talk a little bit about that those very formative days of bringing team members on, because so many people I talked to are really that chicken or the egg is like, they want to do it themselves. They do it as long as they possibly can by themselves. But then there's this wall, I guess you hit at some point where you say, hey, I need help. Right? Right. Well, and you have to, you have to plan for those things a little bit. I mean, you do have to look for plan for that leap. But maybe that's what you were you were asking about is there's always a bit of a gap, there's always a leap that you have to take from, from where you're at just where I was just working by myself to where Okay, now I need a little bit of help. And so now some of the money I was earning myself was going to have to go to pay somebody. And so you do have to be a little strategic about that. But most the time I find that people stop right there on the edge of taking that leap. And they're like, well, what if we know what we don't always know what if sometimes, we had to just go with the with the information we have at the moment, and give it a try. And try to do that smartly. I tried to keep the business incredibly lean, as far as overhead. No extra, sometimes we get so caught up in building a business, we want all this stuff. And we want the desk and we want them you know, the great things. Sometimes you just need a bucket and a broom. You know what I mean? You just got to do the basics, and grow the right things first. So how did you find the people initially on your, you know, how did you start finding people? And how did you start growing your team? Well, I started with family, believe it or not. So my mom, she's like, I'm going to come and help y'all earn a little money on the side and stuff. And I hired my cousin who was in between jobs. So I looked at who was around me first, we went through some job. Companies that you know, they have people that are looking for just part time work or side work or whatever. So I looked at that a little bit, but the cost of that was a little high. And honestly, I went to Craigslist, I crafted an ad that basically looked for I targeted more towards stay at home moms, those that had you know, so maybe part time availability, because I only had part time work, I didn't have full time work. And so I couldn't, you know, give them all of these hours, but I could offer some part time work in between maybe when their kids were at school. So I actually targeted a bit towards somebody that I thought, well, maybe they would have availability, and that works pretty well. I actually landed working with several stay at home moms who would come work while their kids were at school. And that worked out fairly well for a while till we started kind of getting busier and busier. And so as you as you began to grow and get momentum, then you needed to kind of consider more permanent members of your team for lack of a better term. Yeah, we did. And actually one of those members, he actually came to us, just through an ad, he found us I think on Craigslist, he turned out to be local and stuff. He became our first full time team member, he was interested in construction, he was a young man who had started into the college tract and realize that wasn't for him, and that he really wanted to learn a skill. And by that time, my husband Brian had come on board with us and was really starting to build out our construction, side offerings, not just cleaning, we were starting to do some commercial work. We were doing some finish work a little bit of everything within the construction industry. And so we hired him as as Brian's first helper. He had no skill who's completely green, but Brian's been in the industry for 20 some odd years. And so we decided that we would take the avenue of training people because in the construction industry, it's beginning to age out, those that have been in industry a long time are retiring. And with trade schools, either closing or really being reduced either in our high schools or whatever that young young people are just not being trained in, in the trades. And so in our area, at least we were seeing that same thing. There was just a shortage of folks. But there's a shortage of folks that were trained, there was not a shortage of folks that wanted to learn. And that was the difference. We went after the people that wanted to learn. And so and not only because you looked at it from a trades perspective, but you also probably looked at it from a personal perspective, too, in terms of that curiosity as being a critical factor in terms of somebody that would join your team. Yeah, absolutely. I mean, if somebody there's things that we can train and things that we can't train, so, you know, we can definitely train skills, if they have an aptitude towards that and you give them enough time, and and stuff. And so we wanted to build a certain type of culture around that. But we were Yeah, we wanted to take on people that were willing to learn and we were willing to give them a shot. It's a greater risk for us as an employer. Absolutely. The runway is a whole lot longer to get them really up to speed. But I can tell you that if they really find something they love, they also there is a loyalty that starts building there as well. And you can't you can't hire loyalty. You know? So as you were thinking about this culture, was it something that you had written on a on a piece of paper or something that you crafted or something that you just had intuitively that you knew from prior experience that you wanted to instill in terms of the culture that you wanted to help build? Yes, I think it was more somewhat internal based on experience that I had had in my husband Brian had had so he, the person that comes to mind is a gentleman that Brian used to work for when he was in Hitman, when Brian was in his 20s, when we were first newly married, he worked for a contractor, who just really cared not only for Brian, really well, he trained him really well, he cared for us as a family. Like he would ask how I was doing, they would, I still remember the first Christmas, we got to they he gave us a $200 check. Just as a bonus, we were we had never had that experience. And the fact that he did that for a young family. To us, that was like a million bucks, you know, because it allowed us to have some Christmas and there was just a kindness to his to the way he treated us. As a family. He didn't treat Brian as if it was just him, and that he didn't have any other things happening in his life, there was just a care about him that I wanted to, I wanted to do the same thing with our people, we have to treat people as people that have needs and wants and desires and have gifts and dreams themselves. And they have families, you know. So I've also been in situations as an employee, where you know, I was a young mom, and one of my kids get sick, and my boss was just sorry, you got to stay here, it was as if I didn't have a family. And when we treat people that way, you don't get them completely bought in, when you meet their need first and worried about your product. Second, somehow the product takes care of itself. It's just been my experience.

Winston Faircloth:

And that's been mine, too. It's so beautiful. When you have a culture that is centered. With that heart center in the in the middle, people will run through the wall for you. Because they know you care.

Victoria Mininger:

Right? I mean, I call it being what I strive to do is be a servant leader and a boss driven world. Because we have plenty of bosses, I don't want to just be a boss, I want to be somebody that really here's my people, you know, Now, of course, yes, you have to have parameters, you have to have boundaries, you have to have x, we have really high expectations that our company, we expect our people to rise, we tell them exactly where we expect them to rise, and they may not get there right away. But if they're making good concerted effort towards that, then we're going to keep champion that and if they get off track, we're going to address that and they know it, there's no surprises them. And so, for us, it's either you grow in this place, or there may be another place for you. But it just yeah, again, really seeing people for who they are.

Winston Faircloth:

And so one of the things you are on the lookout for it sounds like are these people who have raw talent have raw interest and ability and then you're going to help nurture, grow and equip them to do the kind of to meet these expectations that you have.

Victoria Mininger:

But it is I mean, that's who we hope to find. And we find all sorts we have found, we find folks that come in that think they want to go into the trades, and they get into it for 30 days. And they're like, Okay, this is not for us. Or they get into it. And they're like, I really like this, but I would rather be doing, you know, this type of thing. And maybe we don't do that kind of work, maybe it's finished work or whatever that we don't do. And so a lot of employers, you know, they want to lock in for 30 years. Well, that kind of reality is not reality anymore. That's that's not the reality there is turnover. And so instead, when we first hire somebody, and they're sitting with us at the table at their onboarding, we tell them, Look, we want to hear about your hopes and dreams. We want to know what you've got going on in your life, what do you We don't expect that you're going to stay with us for 30 years. That'd be great. But that's probably not reality. So if you have a dream to start a business of your own, talk to us, let us help you know how to do that. And just know that we're ready for that conversation. We're ready for you to walk in the door and say, I've got this great opportunity I'd like to take so that we can champion champion you on. Yes, we'll be sad to see you go. But if we're truly for people, then we're for people and their hopes and dreams as well.

Winston Faircloth:

Yeah, what an open door. You know, people talk a lot of leaders talk about an open door policy. But this is an open heart policy. Because early in my career, I had a similar situation where I was feeling I was kind of trapped in a role. And I had a I had a manager had a supervisor that invited me in to have a conversation with that. It's like I know that I'm ready to leave in a couple years. What probably gave me more encouragement to go over and above because it's like what can what kind of projects can I take on that will get me ready for that future job that I'm hoping for. And I guess similarly to you when you have those kind of conversations. They can They can take advantage of some mentoring opportunities with you all with some of the ideation in terms of how they make it to the goal that they're really striving for.

Victoria Mininger:

Yeah. And then they feel like they can openly share about that they're not hiding their their gifts and talents. We've got guys that want to be mechanic, maybe hold their own mechanic shop one day, we have others that really want to be musicians and stuff. And so I want to hear about those things that they're doing, I don't want them to head off for the weekend and not feel like they can tell us that, hey, they just played a really in a really great band that weekend, because we're afraid they might, you know, take off and do something else. The reality is life happens. So they may leave because of a opportunity. But they might leave because they're they have to move because of family situations or other things when we lead from a place of saying people have real lives that happen. And we bring that kind of compassion and understanding, then it allows our people to grow. And you never know, sometimes people grow. And they'll start out in our company in one spot. And they grow completely into a whole nother place within our company that they didn't even know that they even had a talent for but with us asking questions and being willing to shift them around a bit, they're able to find that man, they're really able to start thriving in that place. And that's what we want to see whether they're coming to us because they're starting from the bottom. Maybe they really, you know, hit hit rock bottom for some reason, and they just need a chance. Because not everybody that walks in do we know if they've got the talent or the skill to do what we need them to do? It's, it is a risk. But we have found a great, greater value in doing that. And, and we get people asking all the time, how are you finding your staff, we can't find anybody to work for us. You know, again, I think it's several different approaches, but one of them is being willing to train them. And one is being willing to take the risk with people.

Winston Faircloth:

And I'm sure that over time, there's this word of mouth out there that says, hey, these are people you can really talk to, these are people who are going to love you who are going to hold you up, hold you accountable. You know, it's tough love. And there's also this kind of almost a copy love that's going on here at the same time. Right?

Victoria Mininger:

Yeah, I mean, there is I mean, most certainly, we definitely have, you know, our list of people that would like to work for us. And so we don't have enough spots, you know, to hire everybody as much as we'd love to hire everybody, kind of thing. And, and some people really lean into that, just that care, I can tell you that we've had people that, that they've never experienced that in their life, and they just can't get used to it, and they land up leaving, just because it's not a comfortable culture for them. And that's, that's okay, you know, but hopefully it gave them a taste that somebody cares about who they are, and what they can do and who they can become.

Winston Faircloth:

Yeah, good culture, you know, attracts and repels people are well suited for it are going to love it and people who are not ready, will will leave. That's great. So one of the things I love about your story, too, is how you've intentionally invested in your own university there in terms of building your own training program and really make formalizing it in a way. Can you share that story too?

Victoria Mininger:

Sure. Well, yeah, as we got started really into the first couple of years, we realized that while it was a great idea that we wanted to train people, we had to have a system to train people, because that idea of training people is great and all but if you have no platform or anything to run on, you're just kind of shooting into the wind. And so we have a mutual friend, Jeff McManus, who works with small companies are with companies and businesses to help them create their own training programs, their own universities. So we have what's called Bear Creek, you or Bear Creek University. And it's taken some a while to kind of build out and stuff. But basically, it allows people to as soon as we hire them to start running on this training track, the initial parts are just, you know, their initial safety trainings and onboarding and stuff. But it goes from everything from, you know, their basic power tools or whatever skill that they need to learn within the field or in the office setting. And, and so we're able to kind of slowly take them through all the way up to we've got classes now in leadership, everybody goes through leadership doesn't matter where you're starting out in your role. COVID has kind of paused us a little bit there. Because when you're a culture that gathers and then COVID hits, you can't quite gather. So we've had to try to reorient a little bit to, to what works for us. But we've actually pulled all of our training onto an online platform now. So that allows our guys to go through it on their phones, for some of it, some of its in person training, and stuff. So we're definitely not perfect at it. But it definitely has given us a platform and a place to really for the for the folks to be able to see Oh, I am making progress. And I am reaching benchmarks, especially if they really want to move from one position to the next. We need to let people know how to do that. How do I efficiently get from one position to the next and learn what I need to in the process?

Winston Faircloth:

Yes, so many people are listening to this and saying, gosh, that sounds like a great idea. But I have no time to do it. It's kind of like the same with delegation, right? I'd love to have more people to help me. I have no time to train them on what I want. How do you respond to that?

Victoria Mininger:

It takes time. Most certainly, you have to recognize that it's going to take a lot longer to do the training. But, and so we've had to be willing to be a little slower maybe at some of our projects or be a little slower at getting our people where they need to be. But you make time for the things that are important and the things that are going to be the foundation, it's a foundational piece of our business. And so we have to make time for it. So we do that in a couple of different ways. So one of the things that Jeff taught us was the fact that we need to be talking to our people, like if I just go and sit down in my office, and I craft this great training, right? And then I say, here, guys, is what you need to learn. Well, there's no buy into that. They'd be like, What are you talking about? We don't need to do that stuff. So what we've tried to do is go actually into the field, how, you know, tell our guys this is what the class we're trying to build out. What are your thoughts? What are your ideas? What do you feel like you need to learn and get their buy in, and then we do spend some time, and it's one class at a time. Now I will say, since then we've hired an HR assistant, who has been really great at helping us really get all of that information down and into our programs and stuff. And so, but initially, the initial days, it was me and Brian and our leadership team, talking to our guys, and then literally taking, okay, for one hour, I'm going to sit and I'm going to write this class out. And that's just you have to do it bit by bit.

Winston Faircloth:

Yeah, and I think that's the same process with any delegation is at some point, you got to get it out of your head and into some consumable format. And even if it's just recording what you just did, that's better than that's better than winging it.

Victoria Mininger:

Right? Exactly. Well, Brian, and he'll tell you, he's like, I'm not, he's not, he says, He says, he's not the greatest at writing things down. But he could speak really well. And so he'll do videos, or he'll record it down into his phone or whatever, hand that over to our HR assistant, and then she'll just type it all up and clean it up and ask questions, if there's something not clear or whatever. And that's worked really well, for us.

Winston Faircloth:

That's amazing. I love I love just the feel of I want to come work in your business. I mean, you just, I love the care and and consideration that you're doing in terms of intentionally building this business. And, and by the way, it's grown pretty well from you cleaning by yourself to 39 people in a very short period of time in a very challenging economic climate.

Victoria Mininger:

Yeah, it and I can tell you, I did not see this at all, like, four years ago, when I started this. Like I said, I didn't have a five year plan. Sometimes it's just following the breadcrumbs and what doors open as they come along. And so you know, we've had our challenges, we will continue to have our challenges as we grow. But as we approach each one of those challenges, you know, one of the first questions is, what, what do we need to do to put our people first, and that's sometimes hard to answer. But hopefully, we'll be able to continue on and continue to grow and affect people's lives.

Winston Faircloth:

We'll share a little bit, if you will, about your COVID you know, so that impact on your business right out of the gate in terms of that overcoming situation for your business to I think that might be instructive.

Victoria Mininger:

Yeah. So I mean, initially, when COVID hit, I mean, we were we weren't sure what was going to happen, we thought we were gonna have to close down. I mean, nobody knew what was going to go on, right, businesses were having to shut her left and right, and nobody really knew. We saw slow down for a little bit in our phone sales, like phones ringing and stuff for about three weeks, our work continued, because we had contracts already that we were already committed to. But soon after that three week mark, all of a sudden, everybody and their brother decided it was a good time to do a house, you know, house remodel, or whatever. And so our phone has been ringing off the hook since really since probably end of February, something like that. And so it's been really, it's been a really odd time. And we always stay busy. But so it we've had to try to navigate how to best serve our clients that we have, and how to best meet the need that's coming in the door. And really try to decipher who's really our best fit for our client and stuff. You know, now we're hitting a new challenge in that and a lot of people are is that our supplies, the supply line is slowing down. And we're beginning to see a lot of just waiting and things taking a long time prices are going kind of through the roof for supplies. And so we're, we're having to navigate that that's that's a new thing for us right now, in the construction industry as a whole. It's, it's a tough, it's a tough moment, right now to figure out how to overcome that. And so once again, we have to step back and go, Okay, so how do we care for our people in all of this? How do we be honest with them that right now, this is a hard time, you know, for everybody? And how can they jump on board with us? So that we go through this time together that this is a team effort, this is a family effort, we may need to cut some things, but at the end of the day, we're you know, wanting to hold on to our staff. So it's well, it's had a lot of curveballs, right COVID season has. So again, Paul bread crumbs.

Winston Faircloth:

Yeah, the thing I love the most about this story is how you put your people first, even over your clients. A lot of business owners struggle with that, by the way,

Victoria Mininger:

that Well, I think, because serving their clients is the same thing as giving them a product or selling their product. So it's not that our clients are less important than our team. But we have to think about our team first. Because if our team is not doing well, if we haven't cared for them, well, whether they're not physically doing well, whether they're not mentally doing well, what other effects them working for our clients. So for us, if we take care of them first and make sure that their their needs are being met, then the way they serve our clients is vastly better than if we don't, you know, we just throw our team under the bus every time just because we want to satisfy a client or whatever, then you actually for the big picture, risk your business, I think in a greater way.

Winston Faircloth:

Yeah, I am a recovering person on that line of thinking, because I will say that in early part of my career, it was all about the client, maybe it was a people pleasing type situation. But you're right, it It burns out great people very quickly, and it comes back to bite you much faster than you think.

Victoria Mininger:

Yeah, it does. And I mean, everybody wants to be appreciated and, and really know that their work matters. And that that most certainly includes our team members. I mean, most certainly, I want to feel that way. You want to feel that way that your work matters, right. And so when we have people that champion us in our work, we do so much better we rise to the occasion, especially in tough times, you know, right now, you know, our team, I'm hoping that they know they I believe that they know that we're going through this together. And our first concern is them and their families. In this, you know, during these rough times,

Winston Faircloth:

if somebody is out there wanting to change their culture, how would you say would be best to love their team?

Victoria Mininger:

I think first I know this might sound really strange. But first you have to make sure that you're loving and caring for yourself as a leader, because believe me just like you, Winston, I'm a recovering people pleaser. Run too hard, too fast, want to help everybody and their brother and I always put myself at risk. And then I couldn't serve my team. Well, you know, and so it starts with us. It starts with taking care of who we are and our health and all those things, so that we can then really focus and look and see. Okay, how can we truly serve and care for our team? And what are their greatest needs? You know, sometimes building a culture is it's not about all the incentives that you give, or can you give a bonus at the end of the year? No, they want to know that. That if their kid gets sick and they need to leave work that you're going to be okay and not like blow a gasket because they've left work early, you know that it's the little things that I think begin to build culture.

Winston Faircloth:

Amen. So thank you so much. So people who want to learn more about your business and connect with you what's the best way for them to do that?

Victoria Mininger:

So our business website is bear creek.co and that you can definitely find us there Bear Creek Outdoor Living is our name. So you can find our things there. For me personally, victoriamininger.com. I have a website and blog there that I write on and, and stuff so you can find me either place or you can also find us on Bear Creek outdoor living on Facebook, or Instagram. We're in both places, and we share a lot about our projects, but also about our people.

Winston Faircloth:

Thank you Victoria for being our first guest on the For Love of Team podcast. It was a real delight and joy to hear your story.

Victoria Mininger:

Well, thank you so much for having me. It's been a pleasure.

Winston Faircloth:

Are you hitting the wall of complexity in your business? Does the idea of a team feel like a four letter word to you? And are you spending more time grinding in the business than doing the work you love? When you're ready to multiply your impact your income, your margin and your freedom in business. Join hand selected business owners just like you in an upcoming for love of team weekend retreat. Our intimate, immersive and interactive experience helps you one sharpen your focus by doing more of the work you love to simplify your business by eliminating automating delegating other tasks. And three, surround yourself with others doing the work that they love. Our next love team weekend retreat is coming up in just a few weeks and we limit registrations for the maximum support and interactions there. To apply. Check out the show notes for this episode. For a special link to connect directly with me. We'll discuss your situation I'll provide some coaching and we can discuss the next right steps to help you build grow and keep a team you love. That's the four love of team weekend retreat when you're ready to multiply your impact income, margin and freedom in business. And remember, loving your team multiplies your results. get you on the next four level team episode.